It's official: Ford will bring back two iconic models from a bygone era. The Ford Ranger is set to return to North America in 2019, while the Bronco will arrive in markets a year later.

Ford will build both models at the Michigan Assembly plant, the automaker confirmed at the Detroit auto show. No jobs will be added at the Michigan plant to produce the new vehicles when they replace the small cars currently being produced at the plant. The Ranger goes into production late next year to bring back a much-needed midsize pickup offering to Ford's North American lineup. A midsize Bronco is one of five new utility vehicles scheduled to arrive globally by 2020, and it will sit on the same Australian-engineered T6 platform as the new Ranger. Both models will be body-on-frame.

The Ford Ranger was last sold in the U.S. in 2011, although a version of the pickup is still offered in other places around the world. The Bronco was discontinued in the mid-'90s.



The announcement coincides with the debut of the new 2018 Ford F-150 at the Detroit auto show. And Ford says it isn't worried about the new Ranger taking away sales from the F-150. "The best thing is when you cannibalize yourself," Bill Ford told Motor Trend's Detroit editor Alisa Priddle at the show. "I'd rather do it than have someone else do it."

In addition to confirming a new Bronco and Ranger, Ford also announced it would add 13 new electrified vehicles to its lineup over the next five years. These vehicles include a hybrid Mustang that produces V-8 power and, according to product development boss Raj Nair, "even more low-end torque making it more fun to drive." As Ford previously announced, a hybrid version of the F-150 is also on the way. Ford will also introduce a plug-in Transit Custom, two pursuit-rated hybrid police vehicles, and an all-electric small SUV with an estimated range of at least 300 miles. And although there seems to be no immediate plans, Ford has not ruled out a hybrid Bronco down the line.

Also look for a fully autonomous vehicle without pedals or a steering wheel, part of Ford's commitment to offer autonomous vehicles in high volumes to ride-sharing services by 2021.


Text Source: Motor Trend